The Two-Way
5:37 pm
Mon July 16, 2012

Yahoo Appoints Marissa Mayer, A Longtime Google Exec, As CEO

Marissa Ann Mayer gestures as she gives an interview in January of 2008.
Oliver Lang AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon July 16, 2012 5:46 pm

Yahoo is turning to a longtime Google executive to try to turn around the ailing company. Effective tomorrow, Marissa Mayer will be Yahoo's new chief executive. She will be the fifth CEO in as many years.

According to Yahoo's press release, Mayer was one of Google's first employees and most recently she was responsible for the company's local, maps and location services.

Mayer's job, reports the AP, is to help the company "rebound from financial malaise and internal turmoil."

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Money & Politics
5:31 pm
Mon July 16, 2012

New Romney Fund Highlights Fundraising Muscle

Mitt Romney arrives at the Utah Olympic Park for a private dinner during a donor's conference in Park City, Utah, on June 22.
Charles Dharapak AP

Originally published on Mon July 23, 2012 3:30 pm

Republican Mitt Romney's presidential campaign says a recently formed arm of the organization collected more than $10 million a week during a three-month period this spring. And most of the money care from high-end donors.

Romney Victory Inc., got its first four contributions on April 6 — three donations of $50,000 each and one check for $350. Since early April, it's pulled in $140 million.

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It's All Politics
5:29 pm
Mon July 16, 2012

Harry Reid Worries About '17 Angry Old White Men' Buying The Nation

Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, shown July 10 on Capitol Hill, adds another classic bon mot to his record with his worries about "17 angry old white men" buying the country.
J. Scott Applewhite AP

Originally published on Mon July 16, 2012 6:23 pm

Add another line to the list of memorable quotes from Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid.

On Monday, the Nevada Democrat was on the Senate floor defending Democratic-backed campaign-finance legislation known as the DISCLOSE Act when he uttered the following thought (the relevant passage starts at the 8:00 mark in this C-SPAN video):

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Science
5:04 pm
Mon July 16, 2012

Can Science Plant Brain Seeds That Make You Vote?

Adam Cole NPR

Originally published on Thu January 24, 2013 7:03 pm

In 2008, just a few days before the Democratic presidential primary between Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton in Pennsylvania, a large group of Pennsylvania voters got a very unusual phone call.

It was one of those get-out-the-vote reminder calls that people get every election cycle, but in addition to the bland exhortations about the importance of the election, potential voters were asked a series of carefully constructed questions:

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The Two-Way
4:46 pm
Mon July 16, 2012

Woman Accuses George Zimmerman Of Molesting Her For Years

George Zimmerman during a court hearing on June 29.
Joe Burbank AP

The case of George Zimmerman has taken a surprising turn today: In an audio tape released by prosecutors today, a woman accuses Zimmerman of molesting her for about a decade.

Zimmerman has been charged with second-degree murder in the killing of Trayvon Martin. Zimmerman has claimed he killed the unarmed 17-year-old in self-defense. But Martin's family and supporters allege Zimmerman racially profiled the African-American teenager and followed him despite a police dispatcher's advice not to do that.

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The Salt
4:44 pm
Mon July 16, 2012

Some Athletes Reject High-Tech Sports Fuel In Favor Of Real Food

Some athletes are choosing water and real food instead of sports drinks and processed bars and gels.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Thu July 19, 2012 12:22 pm

As the world's greatest athletes gear up for the 2012 Olympic Games in London this month, viewers like us are likely to see a spike in televised ads for sports drinks, nutritional bars, and energy gel — that goop that so many runners and cyclists suck from foil pouches.

Powerade, in fact, is the official sports drink of the 2012 Olympics, and if it's true what these kinds of ads imply, processed sports foods and neon-colored drinks are the stuff that gold medalists are made of.

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Middle East
4:39 pm
Mon July 16, 2012

A Syrian Defector Confronts A Sectarian Divide

Syria's ongoing fighting is increasingly a sectarian conflict with the majority Sunni Muslims facing off against the Alawites who make up most of the country's ruling elite. Here, government opponents rally in the northern town of Mareh on June 29.
Vedat Xhymshit AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon July 16, 2012 8:16 pm

The violence in Syria is increasingly being called a civil war, and it can also be called a sectarian war, because much of the fighting pits the majority Sunni Muslims against the minority Alawites who make up much of the country's leadership.

Yet not everyone fits neatly into a category. There are some Alawites who have joined the uprising.

One 30-year-old Alawite man, who doesn't want his name revealed, is nervous as he lights another cigarette and tells the story of how he came to side with the opposition and turned his back on the Alawite rulers.

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The Two-Way
4:33 pm
Mon July 16, 2012

Kitty Wells, 'Queen Of Country,' Dead At Age 92

Originally published on Mon July 16, 2012 6:21 pm

Kitty Wells, who paved the way for women in country music and was known as the "Queen of Country," has died, the AP reports. She was 92.

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Economy
4:25 pm
Mon July 16, 2012

Call Me Maybe When Your School Loan Is Paid In Full

Some young adults say their student loan debt affects their dating and marriage potential. A few have had partners break up with them over debt, while other couples forge ahead, but keep finances separate and avoid legal marriage.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue July 17, 2012 5:12 pm

The increasing debt load of college graduates has affected young people's lives in untold ways, from career choices to living arrangements. Now add another impact on a key part of young adult life: dating and marriage.

Rachel Bingham, an art teacher in Portland, Maine, learned this a few years back, when a guy broke it off after four months of a budding relationship. Among other reasons, he cited her $80,000 in student loan debt.

"He said it scared him," she recalls, "that it really made him anxious. And he just did not want to take on my responsibility."

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Law
4:06 pm
Mon July 16, 2012

Even Scalia's Dissenting Opinions Get Major Scrutiny

Justice Antonin Scalia testifies before the Senate Judiciary Committee on Oct. 5, 2011.
Alex Wong Getty Images

Originally published on Mon July 16, 2012 10:01 pm

As legal observers have sifted through the ashes and the tea leaves of the recent Supreme Court term, one justice has stood out for his dissents.

Justice Antonin Scalia was the first name on the joint dissent filed by four justices in the health care case. But it was Scalia's dissent in the Arizona immigration case, written for himself alone, that drew particular attention, and especially harsh criticism.

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