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There must be a lot of Democratic Party leaders around Ohio scratching their heads lately.

Why, they must be asking themselves, is P.G. Sittenfeld, the 30-year-old Cincinnati councilman who announced his candidacy for the U.S. Senate some time ago, still in the race?

It’s been almost two weeks now since the Democratic Senate Campaign Committee threw its support behind former governor Ted Strickland for the 2016 U.S. Senate nomination.

Provided / Cincinnati Zoo

The Cincinnati Zoo's ten African painted dog pups finally have names.

The pups, six boys and four girls, were born in January.

Keepers decided on a Batman naming scheme based on identifying marks on each pup.

The names are: Riddler, Ivy, Bruce, Alfred, Oswald, Luke, Lucy, Selina, Hugo and Quinn. Check out how to tell them apart in the slideshow above.

Here's more about painted dogs:

Provided / Stages for Youth

A short film shot in Northside has received an honorable mention in the White House Student Film Festival.  "I Am Urban Art" was produced as part of Stages for Youth.  Frank O'Farrell founded the program last year to teach video production.

Karen Kasler / Ohio Public Radio

A new law now allows access to birth records to 400,000 adoptees from around the world who were born in Ohio between 1964 and 1996. Statehouse correspondent Karen Kasler met a few who traveled from 14 states to gather in Columbus last night, to prepare to be first in line at the Ohio Department of Health on the first day of the new law.

Steve Kelly / Provided

Friday is a special day for Miami Township (Clermont County) Fire Chief Steve Kelly and the other 400,000 people adopted in Ohio between 1964 and 1996.

Until now their adoption records have been sealed, and even such drastic measures as petitioning the court couldn't get them opened.  March 20 is the first day adoptees can officially request their adoption records from the Ohio Department of Health, thanks to a change in Ohio law.

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