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Ann Thompson / WVXU

Cincinnati's annual Opening Day tradition, The Findlay Market Parade, will step off at noon Monday, four hours before the Reds play the Pirates. The 96th annual Opening Day parade features 200 entries, including 12 high school marching bands.

New this year is a float from Rozzi's Famous Fireworks. The company will stay a block ahead of everybody else and shoot off fireworks throughout the parade.

Wikipedia

Growing anything on Mars seems next to impossible. It's rocky, cold and apparently lifeless. As part of the Mars One project, which plans to send people to live there beginning in 2024, university students from Spain and Portugal will test Mars' ability to grow food beginning in 2018.

Yes, this is a politics column.

That’s why it says “Politically Speaking,” right there in red, white and blue.

But let’s face it – tomorrow is Opening Day in Cincinnati, the beginning of another season of baseball for the game’s oldest professional team; and a holiday for those of us who love the game.

Not a day in this part of the world where your thoughts turn immediately to the ins-and-outs of politics.

Unless, that is, you happen to be running for office.

Bill Rinehart / WVXU

The 20th anniversary of the Krohn Conservatory butterfly show is open, featuring butterflies of the Philippines.  Assistant manager Mark House says the island nation is tropical, and has several species of butterflies.

“And we have five of them here," House says. "Species such as the paper kite, the dead leaf as well. Strange name for a butterfly, but it’s beautiful.  They are included with the butterflies that we have in here that come from all over the country; every continent except Antarctica.”

Tana Weingartner / WVXU

Even before midnight, people began gathering at the foot of Mount Adams to participate in a Good Friday tradition dating back to the late 1860s: praying the steps. 

An estimated 8-10,000 people are expected to climb the stairs up the side of Mount Adams to Holy Cross-Immaculata.  Some pray, some read the Bible, and some meditate.

Church historian Jim Steiner says it's not limited to Catholics.  “It’s a spiritual experience,” he says.  “You don’t have to be Catholic to be spiritual.  You don’t even have to be religious to be spiritual.”

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