News

Legislators listening to concerns about time spent on standardized tests

1 hour ago
Tana Weingartner / WVXU

If you talk to a school student, a teacher or a parent these days, you are likely to hear one complaint loud and clear: there is too much testing under new federal education standards. Lawmakers are also hearing that message. Ohio Public Radio’s Jo Ingles reports on what they are doing about it.

U.S. Embassy, Seoul, South Korea

Mark Lippert, the U.S. Ambassador to South Korea and a Cincinnati native, tweeted out this morning that he is "doing well" after being slashed on the right cheek by a blade-wielding man at an event this morning in Seoul.

NPR reported a State Department spokesperson saying that Lippert, a native of Mariemont, was in a hospital in Seoul and that his wound was not life-threatening.

Provided / Cincinnati Museum Center

A world-famous archeologist who will speak in Cincinnati this week says learning about the past can lead to a good future.  Egyptologist Zahi Hawass says that's why it's important to keep uncovering history. 

He is among the archeologists and historians worldwide disturbed by the reports of ISIS fighters smashing antiquities at a museum in Mosul last week.

“We need to stand against all these terrorists.  The people who smash the monuments in Iraq, and in Syria, and in Libya,'' he says. "They are destroying our heritage."

After months of debate, Cincinnati Council gave final approval Wednesday to a compromise ordinance targeting people who let their dangerous or vicious dogs run loose in the city.  The proposal includes tougher fines for owners, but it does not have any criminal sanctions such as jail time.

Council has been debating the city's dog laws after a six-year-old girl was severely injured in a dog attack last summer.

 Council Member Kevin Flynn said the goal is to correct the bad behavior of the owner.

The Butler County Sheriff wants to take over policing duties in Fairfield Township.

In a letter to the township administrator, Sheriff Richard Jones says a proposed 4.8 mil public safety levy is too high. He says he can provide police services for what the levy currently generates, about $1.8 million he says.

He's proposing a five year agreement.

Township officials say they’ve received the sheriff’s letter but no formal action has been taken at this time.

Pages