Politics

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Hamilton County Board of Elections

The Hamilton County Board of Elections unanimously voted Tuesday morning on a lease agreement for a new home in Norwood, on the site of the former General Motors plant.

In January, the board of elections, now located at 824 Broadway Downtown, will move all of its operations into Norwood's Central Parke office complex on Smith Road.

WVXU politics reporter Howard Wilkinson talked Monday morning with Jay Hanselman about Tuesday's presidential primary in Indiana. Will Hoosier Republicans help Donald Trump secure the GOP presidential nomination; or will they knock him off track by going for Ted Cruz of Texas?

The past seven days may well have been the most bizarre week of presidential politics in our lifetimes.

WVXU politics reporter Howard Wilkinson talked with News Director Maryanne Zeleznik Monday morning about the arrangement announced Sunday night by the campaigns of Ted Cruz and John Kasich aimed at stopping Donald Trump from winning a first-ballot victory at the Republican National Convention. Kasich will give Cruz a clear path in Indiana's May 3 primary, while Cruz will get out of Kasich's way in the primaries of Oregon and New Mexico. 

City of Dayton, City of Cincinnati

Cincinnati has double the population of Dayton, Ohio, yet the cities share similar characteristics and face many of the same challenges and opportunities. WVXU political reporter Howard Wilkinson joins us as we talk with Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley and Cincinnati Mayor John Cranley about working together for the benefit of both cities, and their thoughts on the future for what could one day become a combined Cincinnati-Dayton metropolitan area. 

WVXU politics reporter Howard Wilkinson talked with News Director Maryanne Zeleznik Monday morning about whether or not it is inevitable that the GOP will have a contested convention in Cleveland in July and Donald Trump's claims that the delegate session process is rigged against him. 

  Maybe, if you believe in April's polling as a predictor of what could happen in the Nov. 8 presidential election, the Republicans already have a candidate who could beat the Democratic front-runner, Hillary Clinton, in the Electoral College.

Whoop her by a long shot, in fact.

That candidate would be the governor of Ohio, John Kasich.

However, there is a big problem with this theory – not nearly enough Republican voters are casting ballots for him in the primaries and caucuses.

WVXU politics reporter Howard Wilkinson talked with news director Maryanne Zeleznik Monday morning about the state of the race for the GOP presidential nomination. A few weeks ago, it seemed inevitable that Donald Trump could not be stopped. Now, the chances that he will go to the convention with less delegates than he needs to win on the first ballot seem more and more likely. 

pixabay.com

The current presidential campaign is the most unusual in recent memory, with unconventional candidates and campaigns that continue to confound political pundits. And the way candidates are using social media has been a major reason political experts can't seem to get a handle on this election.

For local political party leaders, the trouble with presidential election years is that they don't happen in a vacuum.

While there is no more important decision voters will make on Nov. 8 than who will be the 45th President of the United States, a county party chairman has to worry about all the down-ticket races as well – the county commissioners, the county office-holders, the local judgeships.

Provided

We're in the middle of a full week without a primary, but that doesn't mean there has been a lull in the race to the White House. The candidates and their campaigns are keeping things interesting, if not all that presidential.

Howard Wilkinson

Cincinnati Mayor John Cranley said Tuesday morning he has a majority of city council willing to support his plan to substantially raise the city's minimum wage for full-time and part-time employees.

WVXU politics reporter Howard Wilkinson talked with News Director Maryanne Zeleznik Monday morning about the impact President Obama's nomination of Merrick Garland to the U.S. Supreme Court could have on Ohio's U.S. Senate race between Republican incumbent Rob Portman and Democratic challenger Ted Strickland. 

It was not as if Ohio's junior U.S. senator, Rob Portman of Terrace Park, didn't have enough headaches to deal with in his bid for a second six-year term when the conundrum of President Obama's nomination of Judge Merrick Garland came along.

The Democratic Party leadership in Washington already saw Portman as vulnerable; and an important key to the Democrats' ambitions to re-take control of the U.S. Senate in November. It is not, by any means, a pie-in-the-sky ambition.

Tana Weingartner / WVXU

Vice President Joe Biden will be in Cincinnati Tuesday morning for a high-dollar private fundraiser for former Ohio governor Ted Strickland's U.S. Senate campaign.

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