Politics

Political news

WVXU politics reporter Howard Wilkinson talked with news director Maryanne Zeleznik Monday about Monday night's Iowa presidential caucuses. Who might come away as winners? And does it really matter in the quest for the White House? 

  From afar, the Iowa caucuses look like a chaotic state fair midway, with candidates playing bumper cars as they careen around the state in search of voters for Monday’s first-in-the-nation caucus.

Yes, it chaos – controlled chaos, but chaos nonetheless.

But when you are there on the ground, watching it up close, as 19 Xavier University students were last weekend, it is a whirlwind, but one that makes sense.

And, as the Xavier students found, one that the people of Iowa revel in every four years.

Provided

After months of campaigning, we are finally just days away from the first vote on the path to the presidency, the Iowa caucuses. Followed just a week later by the New Hampshire primary.

WVXU politics reporter Howard Wilkinson talked with news director Maryanne Zeleznik Monday morning about the role Ohio and Kentucky are likely to play in the selection of Democratic and Republican presidential nominees.

cliparthut.com

One of the most important factors in any election is how the voters feel, about the direction of the country, their personal situations, and what the future may hold for them and their families. And this year voters are nervous, angry and frustrated.

There was a time, not so long ago, when the nation’s Amalgamated Union of American Political Pundits (OK, there’s no such organization, but you know what we mean) had Ohio’s junior senator, Rob Portman, on its list of potential Republican presidential contenders.

But Portman, the Terrace Park Republican, took himself out of the running early on and committed to running for re-election to a second term in the U.S. Senate, where he has, in a few short years, become a significant voice for the GOP and a close ally of Majority Leader Mitch McConnell.

WVXU politics reporter Howard Wilkinson talked with news director Maryanne Zeleznik Monday morning about the challenges Ohio Gov. John Kasich faces over the next month in his quest for the Republican presidential nomination. 

  Stop the presses! Rip up the front page! News flash!

The Ohio Republican Party’s central committee endorsed Ohio Gov. John Kasich in the March 15 GOP presidential primary Friday on a 44-9 vote.

What? You are not stunned by this news?

That’s OK. No one else was either.

Some Republicans around the state were grumbling about it, believing that the state party has no business butting into a presidential primary campaign.

www.eclectablog.com

This is a big year for politics, nationwide, and here at home, from the Hamilton County Commission race to the race for the White House.

U.S. Senate/U.S. State Department

Ohio Democrats will gather in all 16 of the state’s congressional districts Tuesday night to select delegate and alternate slates for Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders in Ohio’s March 15 primary election.

Ohio Republicans don’t use the caucus system to select delegates at the congressional district level – the campaigns of all 11 GOP candidates who have qualified for the March primary ballot have already been named by their campaigns and filed with the Ohio Secretary of State’s office.

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