Politics

Political news

WVXU politics reporter Howard Wilkinson talked with Maryanne Zeleznik Monday morning about the sinking poll numbers in Ohio Gov. John Kasich's Republican presidential bid; and what's in store Tuesday night at the first Democratic presidential debate. 

  Last Monday, at the beginning of what turned out to be a not-so-hot week for Ohio’s governor, John Kasich, he said something at the opening of his New Hampshire presidential campaign headquarters that was very revealing; and very frank.

“We’ve got about 128 days to go until the New Hampshire primary,’’ the Boston Globe reported Kasich as saying. “We do well here; we’re moving on. We do terrible here; it’s over. No confusion about that. This is very, very important to us.”

Wikimedia Commons

A Quinnipiac University poll released Thursday morning shows a majority of Ohio voters support legalizing the personal use of marijuana, but nearly two-thirds said they would “definitely not” use it if legalized.

And the same poll showed that in the 2016 U.S. Senate race in Ohio, the front-runner for the Democratic nomination, former governor Ted Strickland, leads incumbent Republican Rob Portman by three percentage points.

Keith Lanser / Licensed under Public Domain via Wikimedia Commons

The most contentious issue on the ballot this November in Cincinnati centers around something almost everyone agrees on – that the city of Cincinnati has a very good park system.

But the proponents of Issue 22 – a charter amendment that would place a permanent one mill tax in the city charter for park improvements – believe they could be even better.

The Hamilton County Board of Elections has identified a dozen voter registration forms filed by the campaign to legalize marijuana that may be fraudulent.

And, election officials say, they are examining hundreds more filed by The Strategy Network, a company headed by Ian James, who is also running ResponsibleOhio, the campaign for Issue 3, which would legalize marijuana.

Howard Wilkinson

Rand Paul, Kentucky’s junior senator, didn’t bring up the subject of his campaign for the Republican presidential nomination when he spoke to the Florence Rotary Club Monday, but he had plenty to say about it to reporters afterwards.

Paul, who is mired in the single digits in national polls, took a back-handed swipe at the Republican candidate who is leading most national polls, business mogul Donald Trump – and he did it without mentioning him by name.

WVXU politics reporter Howard Wilkinson talked with news director Maryanne Zeleznik Monday morning about the important role Hamilton County is likely to play in the presidential race next year; and how it will impact local races. 

In 2012, Time Magazine did a story based on an interesting premise: that five counties in Ohio – the ultimate swing state, the bellwether of the nation – could decide the presidential election between Barack Obama and Mitt Romney.

Yes, Hamilton County was one of them - perhaps the most important of them.

The others were Cuyahoga, Franklin, Stark and Montgomery.

Obama won them; won Ohio; and won a second term in the White House.

Butler County Sheriff's Office

Butler County Sheriff Richard K. Jones, a Republican, took himself out of the running Friday for House Speaker John Boehner’s soon-to-be vacant House seat.

Jones, who has built a national reputation as a crusader against illegal immigration, put out a written statement Friday morning saying that he has “been fortunate enough to receive an enormous amount of support from citizens in and around Butler County.”

Provided

Butler County Auditor Roger Reynolds has filed papers with the Federal Elections Commission for a possible run for the 8th Congressional District seat being vacated by House Speaker John Boehner

But Reynolds told WVXU he has yet to make up his mind about whether or not he will run.

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