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There really weren’t supposed to be any races for municipal court judgeships in Hamilton County this year.

But, as it turns, a promotion of one municipal court judge and the election of another to a higher court, has produced two races for the unexpired terms.

But not everyone in the county will get to vote on them. Both judgeships are in one of the county’s seven municipal court districts.

What happened was this:

Political outsiders Donald Trump and Ben Carson continue to lead the Republican field of candidates by wide margins, Hillary is polling far ahead of Bernie Sanders, though his numbers actually went up after the first Democratic debate. And now neither has to worry about Vice President Joe Biden jumping into the race.

  Most of the race between Democrat Jack Conway and Republican Matt Bevin, has been mean as a rattlesnake, and just as venomous, with attack ads and mail pieces clogging the airwaves and the mailboxes of the Commonwealth.

But the end of a debate on Kentucky Educational Television Monday night – the last before the election between Bevin and Conway ended on an almost conciliatory note.

Kentucky voters head to the polls next Tuesday to choose the commonwealth'’s next governor: businessman and Republican Matt Bevin, or Democrat and current Kentucky Attorney General Jack Conway.

WVXU politics reporter Howard Wilkinson talked with news director Maryanne Zeleznik Monday morning about polls showing Republican U.S. Sen. Rob Portman trailing former Ohio governor Ted Strickland; and what Portman is doing to catch up. 

  If Ohio’s junior U.S. senator, Rob Portman, is a man afraid of losing his job in next year’s election, he didn’t let on Saturday morning in the parking lot of a strip center in Terrace Park where his local campaign office is located.

Under gray and foreboding skies, Portman held U.S. Rep. Brad Wenstrup’s nearly two-year-old son in his arms while Wenstrup introduced him to a crowd of well over 100 people – the majority of them young people – who had come out on a Saturday morning to work phone banks and knock on doors for Portman’s re-election campaign.

Keith Lanser / Licensed under Public Domain via Wikimedia Commons

To say the proponents of Issue 22, which would place a one mill permanent tax levy in Cincinnati’s charter, are out-spending the opposition would be the understatement of the century.

Citizens for Cincinnati Parks, the pro-Issue 22 committee, raised $647,535 through Oct. 14, according to campaign finance reports filed Thursday. Just over half of the money came from corporate interests and corporations.

Save Our Parks, the committee opposed to Issue 22, raised only $3,154, according to its campaign finance report.

Howard Wilkinson

It hasn’t happened often since former Ohio governor Ted Strickland and Cincinnati council member P.G. Sittenfeld began running against each other for the Democratic U.S. Senate nomination early this year.

Monday night, the two were in the same room at the same place at the same time – a Hamilton County Democratic Party fall fundraiser at Longworth Hall.

And they might as well have been 200 miles apart.

WVXU politics reporter Howard Wilkinson talked with news director Maryanne Zeleznik Monday morning about the struggle of Cincinnati's P.G. Sittenfeld to catch up with Ted Strickland in Ohio's U.S. Senate primary. 

Sometimes, when we think about P.G. Sittenfeld and his long-shot bid for the Democratic nomination for U.S. senator from Ohio, an old Frank Sinatra novelty song becomes our ear-worm of the day:

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