Politics

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Kentucky’s junior senator, Rand Paul, has been off and running (officially) for the Republican presidential nomination for nearly a week now.

He has, in fact, been running for several years, but he made it official last week with his “Stand with Rand” tour through early primary and caucus states – Iowa, New Hampshire, South Carolina, Nevada.

WVXU politics reporter Howard Wilkinson spoke with news director Maryanne Zeleznik this morning on Cincinnati's love affair with the Reds and the tradition of politics and baseball intersecting  on Opening Day. 

Yes, this is a politics column.

That’s why it says “Politically Speaking,” right there in red, white and blue.

But let’s face it – tomorrow is Opening Day in Cincinnati, the beginning of another season of baseball for the game’s oldest professional team; and a holiday for those of us who love the game.

Not a day in this part of the world where your thoughts turn immediately to the ins-and-outs of politics.

Unless, that is, you happen to be running for office.

WVXU politics reporter Howard Wilkinson talked this morning with Jay Hanselman about the possibility that both Ohio and Kentucky will have contenders for the GOP presidential nomination - Ohio Gov. John Kasich and Kentucky's Sen. Rand Paul.

Ohio is a quadrennial battleground in presidential elections; and Kentucky – well, Kentucky is not, but they do love their politics in the Commonwealth. Though not as much as they love their basketball.

But the two states separated by the muddy river may both do something they don’t do very often, at least not in the past century: produce bona fide presidential candidates.

They are, of course, the junior U.S. senator from Bowling Green, Ky., Rand Paul; and the native Pennsylvanian-turned-Buckeye who was re-elected governor last fall in a cakewalk, John Kasich.

The 2015 session of the Kentucky General Assembly wrapped up Tuesday night in a burst of last-minute activity that resulted in the passage of several bills, including legislation to address the state’'s heroin problem. Joining us to review that bill and other key legislation passed in this session of the General Assembly are State Representative Dennis Keene; Rae Hodge, editor of The Oldham Era newspaper; and James Pilcher, Northern Kentucky reporter for The Cincinnati Enquirer.

  Personal emails from Hillary, a public letter from Senate Republicans, speeches by possible candidates who may or may not be running for president, and Instagram photos posted by a House member, politicians are doing a lot of communicating lately. But what they are trying to say is often a mystery. 

  Former Ohio Governor and six-term US Congressman Ted Strickland and P.G. Sittenfeld, now serving his second term on Cincinnati’'s City Council, are in the Democratic primary race to decide who will challenge Republican Senator Rob Portman in the November 2016 general election. WVXU political reporter Howard Wilkinson interviewed each candidate, and joins us as we listen to what they had to say about key issues in the race.

WVXU politics reporter Howard Wilkinson talked with news director Maryanne Zeleznik about  what is at stake in the 2016 U.S. Senate race in Ohio.

There must be a lot of Democratic Party leaders around Ohio scratching their heads lately.

Why, they must be asking themselves, is P.G. Sittenfeld, the 30-year-old Cincinnati councilman who announced his candidacy for the U.S. Senate some time ago, still in the race?

It’s been almost two weeks now since the Democratic Senate Campaign Committee threw its support behind former governor Ted Strickland for the 2016 U.S. Senate nomination.

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