Politics

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WVXU politics reporter Howard Wilkinson talked with News Director Maryanne Zeleznik Monday morning about tomorrow's Super Tuesday primaries and whether or not Ohio Gov. John Kasich has any chance of making progress in his long-shot bid for the Republican presidential nomination. 

  It’s really hard to deny now that, believe it or not, Donald Trump may be unstoppable in his march to the Republican presidential nomination.

Ohio’s governor, John Kasich, one of the five GOP contenders still standing, doesn’t think so, but it is really very hard to see the narrow path Kasich will have to trod to supplant Trump when the Republicans meet in Cleveland in July for their presidential nominating convention.

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As the strangest presidential primary race in recent memory continues and we head into Super Tuesday, Political Junkie Ken Rudin and WVXU political reporter Howard Wilkinson join us to discuss the latest news in the Republican and Democratic contests.

Former Democratic governor Ted Strickland and Republican incumbent Rob Portman are in a virtual tie for Ohio's U.S. Senate seat, according to a Quinnipiac University poll released Wednesday.

The same poll shows that Ohio Gov. John Kasich, if he becomes the Republican presidential nominee, would easily defeat either former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton or Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders in Ohio, a crucial swing state in this fall’s presidential election.

  John Kasich - who was re-elected as Ohio's governor  in 2014 with 64 percent of the vote - is trailing Republican front-runner Donald Trump by five percentage points among likely Ohio GOP primary voters, according to a poll released Tuesday morning by Quinnipiac University. 

The Quinnipiac Poll had Trump with 31 percent support among Ohio Republicans, compared to 26 percent for Kasich. 

WVXU politics reporter Howard Wilkinson spoke with news director Maryanne Zeleznik this morning about Ohio Gov. John Kasich's fifth place finish in South Carolina. Kasich is staying in the race, but he must start winning state primaries, Wilkinson said.

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  For their book, “Running for Office: Why Young Americans are Turned Off to PoliticsJennifer Lawless and Richard Fox asked more than 4,000 young Americans if they were interested in running for office one day. Eighty-nine percent of respondents said no. So what drives someone to run for political office at a time in their life when most of their peers are focusing their time and energy on building their careers and starting families?

Wednesday marks the first of 27 days of early voting before Ohio's March 15th primary election.

Ohio's 88 county boards of elections can begin mailing out absentee ballots to those who have applied for them; and voters can cast ballots at specific times at board of election offices.

Because this is a presidential primary election for both Republicans and Democrats, election officials like Sherry Poland, Hamilton County's elections director, are preparing for large numbers of early voters.

Well, no need for John Kasich to pack his bags, come home and go back to his day job as Ohio’s governor.

He had a very respectable second-place finish in New Hampshire last Tuesday, even though his 16 percent of the vote was less than half of that of the 600-pound gorilla in the room, Donald Trump.

Democratic voters in the 31st Ohio House District have no less than six candidates from which to choose to replace incumbent Democrat Denise Driehaus, who is term-limited out of the Ohio House this year.

There is but one lone Republican on the primary ballot.

This should tell you something about the 31st – it is a heavily Democratic district.

In fact, the 31st Ohio House District was something of a gift that the Ohio Apportionment Board, controlled by Republicans, gave Democrats after the legislative district were re-drawn following the 2010 Census.

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