Political news

After years of legal limbo for same-sex couples in four states including Ohio and Kentucky, the U.S. Supreme Court has reversed an appeals court decision, deciding that same-sex couples have the right to marry in all 50 states. Attorney Jennifer Branch, partner with Gerhardstein & Branch, lead counsel in two of the six consolidated cases collectively known as Obergefell v.

  Terrorists have certainly existed, here and in other countries, long before September 11, 2001. But since 9-11, deaths caused by terrorist attacks worldwide have increased 60%. Even with today’s heightened vigilance and increased efforts to combat terrorism, most of us had never heard of ISIS or ISIL just a year ago. 

If the election were held today, former Ohio governor Ted Strickland would defeat Republican incumbent Rob Portman in in the U.S. Senate race, according to an independent poll released Monday morning.

The Quinnipiac University poll – which looked at Senate races in Ohio, Florida and Pennsylvania – had the former Democratic governor with 46 percent support to 40 percent for Portman, the Terrace Park Republican who is running for a second term.

Michael Keating

  WVXU politics reporter Howard Wilkinson talked with news director Maryanne Zeleznik Monday morning about a poll showing good news for John Kasich in Ohio; and some less than encouraging numbers for Hillary Clinton in three key swing states.. 

  Yes, the Quinnipiac University Poll that came out this week – known in political circles as the Q-Poll – showed Ohio Gov. John Kasich leading Democratic presidential front-runner Hillary Clinton by seven percentage points in Ohio, a key battleground state.

Well, that’s interesting, but it was not the worst news for Clinton in the Q-Poll of three key swing states – Ohio, Pennsylvania and Florida.

Karen Kasler / Ohio Public Radio

Ohio Gov. John Kasich would defeat Democratic presidential front-runner Hillary Clinton in Ohio if the election were held today, according to a new independent poll.

And Clinton runs dead even with Kentucky Sen. Rand Paul in the Buckeye State, according to the poll released Wednesday morning by the Quinnipiac University Polling Institute.

  WVXU politics reporter Howard Wilkinson talked with news director Maryanne Zeleznik morning about the historic and unique role Ohio has played in choosing the nation's presidents. 

  Ha! We knew it all along!

Now we have the numbers to prove it! Real, live numbers – and, in politics, you’re best off not arguing with numbers.

At last we can prove what we knew intuitively all along – that there is no better state to look at than Ohio as the predictor of who the next president will be.  And it is the state where the vote in presidential elections most closely mirrors the nation’s vote as a whole.

Ohio is, in fact, the ultimate bellwether state.

The presidential candidate who isn’t a presidential candidate but will probably soon be a presidential candidate spent part of the past week in New Hampshire, the place where presidential candidacies go to either be born or die on the vine.

We’re talking John Kasich, the 69th governor of Ohio here.

The governor of a key swing state who has been racing around from one early primary or caucus state for months now, dropping big hints about wanting to be president, but always stopping short of announcing his candidacy.

WVXU politics reporter Howard Wilkinson talked with news director Maryanne Zeleznik Monday morning about the divisions among Kentucky Republicans; and how gubernatorial candidate Matt Bevin can mend fences for the fall campaign.