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Update Sept. 2​6, 2016: The Ohio Democratic Party has taken the unusual step of endorsing a write-in candidate in the Second Congressional District race. 

Saturday, party leaders met in Columbus and gave their endorsement to Janet Everhard, a retired physician from New Richmond over the man who won the March Democratic primary, truck driver William R. Smith of Pike County.

WVXU reporter Howard Wilkinson spoke with news director Maryanne Zeleznik this morning about expectations for the first presidential debate tonight; and about last week's ruling by the U.S. Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals saying the purge of Ohio voter rolls is unconstitutional. 

Millennials. They're a bunch of tough nuts to crack.

Especially if you are Hillary Clinton and you look at polling which shows that the 18 to 35 year old voters aren’t exactly in love with you.

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The Ohio Supreme Court has ruled that Norwood voters won't be voting on a ballot issue in November which would decriminalize marijuana in the city.

Sensible Norwood, the group which circulated the petitions to put the issue on the Nov. 8 ballot, appealed to the Ohio Supreme Court after the Hamilton County Board of Elections rejected the ballot issue in August. 



The first presidential campaign television commercial ran in 1952, during the race between Dwight Eisenhower and Adlai Stevenson. TV political advertising has changed dramatically since then, and evolved into a mix of part art, part science. 


Harvard Law School Professor and best-selling author Lawrence Lessig made a bid for the presidency last year. He entered the Democratic primary race but soon abandoned his effort. 


Since the 19th century, the only Democrats to lose Ohio yet win the presidency were John F. Kennedy and Franklin D. Roosevelt. And no Republican has ever lost the state and won the White House. 

There is a reason Ohio is called the bellwether of American presidential politics – a reason why it is watched so closely by the political professionals and the pundits every year.

Ohio is a microcosm of America, except in a few demographic categories, such as the percentage of Hispanic population – 17 percent nationwide, only 3.3 percent in Ohio.

WVXU politics reporter Howard Wilkinson spoke with news director Maryanne Zeleznik this morning about the 2017 Cincinnati city elections - with three open council seats and the mayor, John Cranley, up for re-election. What's at stake for Cranley in this council race, should he win a second term? 

Let's all take a breather from Clinton-Trump, Portman-Strickland, et al, for a moment and think about the year 2017.

Specifically, let's think for a moment about the Cincinnati City Council race, where, for the second time since the city charter was changed, nine council members will be elected to four year  terms.

And let's think about the fact that one-third of those seats on city council will be  wide open; and what that might mean for Mayor John Cranley – assuming (and, really, it is way too early to be assuming anything) he is re-elected.

Howard Wilkinson

Cincinnati Council member Kevin Flynn said Wednesday that he won't run for a second term on city council next year, but Thursday, he left the door open just a bit to a possible return in the future.

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Ohio Public Radio member station WCPN ideastream is tracking presidential campaign stops in Ohio following the major party conventions. This includes official campaign rallies, known private fundraising events and public stops in smaller venues.



Given just how unusual this presidential campaign has been, political pundits have found it difficult to accurately predict what is going to happen next. 

Howard Wilkinson

Bill Clinton, the 42nd president of the United States, told thousands of union workers at Coney Island Monday that this is a strange election, but one where they must work to make his wife, Hillary Clinton, the 45th president.

"She never got anything done in Washington- as First Lady, as senator, as Secretary of State – without the strong support from Democrats and Republicans,'' Clinton told the crowd at the annual Cincinnati AFL-CIO Labor Council picnic.

There are those who are ready to stick a fork in the U.S. Senate campaign of former Ohio governor Ted Strickland and declare him done.

Strickland, of course, is not among them.